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SAFER THAN FLARES….SAFE FOR THE ENVIRONMENT.

 

imageThe SOS Distress Light is the first and only acceptable LED Visual Distress Signal Device to completely replace dangerous and environmentally harmful pyrotechnic flares for "Night time Visual Distress Signal for Boats."

In the US the Coast Guard-Compliant Orange Distress Flag fulfils the legal requirement for "Day Visual Distress Signal for Boats" (46 CFR 160.072).

The optical design of the Sirius SOS Distress Light provides an Omni- directional light display for surface rescue craft and a vertical beam visible to aircraft flying overhead.

The light is visible up to 10+ nautical miles, and the SOS C-1001’s beam lasts for hours compared to the minutes-long lifespan of traditional pyrotechnic distress.

No more expired flares to dispose of, no more hazardous flares to store.

No more fear of getting burned or setting your boat on fire if you have to use your flares.

 

 

 

FEATURES AND BENEFITS

  • Complies with all U.S. Coast Guard requirements for “Night Visual Distress Signals” 46 CFR 161.013
  • When combined with the included daytime distress signal flag, meets all USCG Federal Requirements for carriage of DAY and NIGHT VDS.
  • Designed, engineered, patented, and produced in the USA.
  • ONE TIME PURCHASE — no expiry date so no disposal is needed
  • Family SAFE
  • SIMPLE on/off switch
  • Visible up to 10+ nautical miles
  • Environmentally safe

When will the UK see the light !

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Keeping Track of Everything–part 3 …

Jeff Seigel, founder of ActiveCaptain, writes…

This series has generated a lot of interest so we’ll pick up the pace and continue with it. After today’s newsletter, there’ll be one more segment and then we’ll provide templates for all of the databases. We’ve been in contact with the HanDBase developers and they’ll host the templates on their own website so boaters everywhere can use them as a starting point.

If this is the first time you’re seeing this series, you might want to refer back to the index of newsletters to see the other segments.

…….Click Keeping Track of Everything–part 3 … …. to continue reading

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Jump start your engine or genset with Lithium-ion ?…

 

WEEGO have produced a jump start battery that fits in your pocket !.. Weego, an innovator in portable battery solutions, announced the launch of its Weego Jump Starter Battery+ for the marine market. A compact and portable jump starter, the Jump Starter Battery+ eliminates the worry and fear of a dead battery, for as little as $99.00.

“Dead batteries at best ruin your day and at worst put you in a tight spot,” said Gerry Toscani, CEO, Weego. “Our small, high-powered Weego Jump Starters are perfect for boaters. Lithium-ion

…….Click Jump start your engine or genset with Lithium-ion ?… …. to continue reading

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Keeping Track of Everything – part 2 …

Jeff Seigel, founder of ActiveCaptain, writes…

A couple of weeks ago we wrote a newsletter segment about how we keep databases of projects, logs, parts, and fuel purchases. It generated a lot of emails and responses. So we thought we'd dig into the subject a little deeper and give the next set of ideas about the things we've learned by keeping these databases at our fingertips over the last 13 years.

We're using off-the-shelf database tools to create our solution. While there are many solutions that are laptop or web-based, they have

…….Click Keeping Track of Everything – part 2 … …. to continue reading

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Where in the world am I? Ah, that’s the great puzzle….

Apologies to Lewis Carroll for the mis-quote above, but we are so accustomed to knowing exactly where we are – or at least having smartphones and chart plotters telling us.

I have noticed that some power boat skippers and even sailors (hrmphh) plot routes perilously close to hazards or marker buoys. As if the GPS is so accurate that it can help you miss a hazard by metres; that the hazard marker hasn’t drifted since the chart in the plotter was last updated; or that the hazard itself hasn't moved – a sandbank for example.

…….Click Where in the world am I? Ah, that’s the great puzzle…. …. to continue reading

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